History 6395  The British Atlantic in the Age of Slavery

 

Thursdays 5:30-8:30p

Instructor: Karl Ittmann

Email Kittmann@mail.uh.edu.

530 AH, ext 33102

Office Hours T, 1-2pm, TH 10:30-11:30 and by appointment

 

This course examines the development of the Atlantic world after 1500. It places a special emphasis on the role of England and Great Britain in this process, but will also examine the role of Africa and other European societies as well. Each student is expected to participate in class discussions and will be responsible for leading class discussion for one seminar session. Each student will prepare a 20-25 page historiographic essay on a topic in Atlantic history of his or her choosing to be selected in consultation with the instructor. Comparative topics are allowed and can be structured to fit particular geographic or topical interests. Grades will be determined by the following formula, Class participation and presentation 50%, essay 50%.

 

Reading List

Robin Blackburn, The Making of New World Slavery

Seymour Drescher, Capitalism and Anti-Slavery

David Eltis, Europeans and the Rise of African Slavery in the Americas

Pieter Emmer, The Dutch in the Atlantic Economy

Linebaugh and Rediker, The Many Headed Hydra

Patrick Manning, Slavery and African Life

Joseph Miller,  Way of Death

John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World

Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery

 

Schedule of Classes

Week 1 January 17 Introduction

 

Week 2 January 24  Defining the Atlantic Economy

Robin Blackburn, The Making of New World Slavery, 1-83, 217-262, 307-593

 

Week 3 January 31st  Slavery and Race

David Eltis, Europeans and the Rise of African Slavery in the Americas

 

Week 4 February 7 Labor and the Atlantic Economy

Linebaugh and Rediker, The Many Headed Hydra

Nicholas Rogers, “Vagrancy, Impressment and the Regulation of Labour in 18th century Britain,” Slavery and Abolition, 1994 15(2), 102-113.

 

Week 5 February 14 Africa and Slavery

Patrick Manning, Slavery and African Life

John Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1-125.

 

Week 6 February 21 Identity in the Atlantic World

Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 129-334

David Armitage, “Making the Empire British: Scotland in the Atlantic World 1542-1707,” Past and Present, 1997, (155), 34-63.

Nicholas Canny, “The Marginal Kingdom: Ireland as a Problem in the First British Empire,” in Bernard Bailyn and Philip Morgan, eds. Strangers within the Realm, 35-66.

Michael Craton, “Reluctant Creoles: The Planter’s World in the British West Indies,” in Bernard Bailyn and Philip Morgan, eds. Strangers within the Realm, 314-362.

Jack Greene, “Empire and Identity from the Glorious Revolution to the American Revolution,” in The Oxford History of the British Empire,  208-230.

Robin Law and Kristin Mann, “West Africa in the Atlantic Community: The Case of the Slave Coast,” William and Mary Quarterly, 1999, 56(2), 307-334.

James Merrell, “’The Customes of our Countrey’: Indians and Colonists in Early America,” in Bernard Bailyn and Philip Morgan, eds. Strangers within the Realm, 117-156.

Philip Morgan, “Cultural Implications of the Atlantic Slave Trade,” Slavery and Abolition, 18(1), 1997 122-145.

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Week 7 February 28 The Dutch Atlantic

Pieter Emmer, The Dutch in the Atlantic Economy

 

Week 8 March 7  No class Spring Break

 

Week 9 March 14 The Portuguese, Brazil and Africa

Joseph Miller, Way of Death

 

Week 10  March 21 Abolition-Part I

Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery

 

Week 11 March 28  Abolition-Part II

Seymour Drescher, Capitalism and Anti-Slavery

Selwyn Carrrington, “British West Indian Economic Decline and Abolition 1775-1807,” Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, 1989 14(27) 33-59.

Robert Conrad, “Economics and Ideals: The British Anti-Slavery Debate Reconsidered,” Indian Historical Review 1988-89 15(1-2) 212-232.

Chaim Kaufmann and Robert Pape, “Explaining Costly International Moral Action: Britain’s Sixty-Year Campaign Against the Atlantic Slave Trade,“ International Organization, 1999, 53(4) 631-668.

Clare Midgley, “Slave Sugar Boycotts, Female Activism and the Domestic Base of  British Anti-Slavery Campaign,” Slavery and Abolition, 1996, 17(3), 137-62.

David Ryden, “Does Decline Make Sense? The West Indian Economy and the Abolition of the British Slave Trade,” Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 2001, 31(3) 347-374.

 

Week 12 April 4 Free Labor and the end of Slavery

Henrice Altink, “Slavery by Another Name: Apprenticed Women in Jamaican Workhouses in the Period, 1834-8,” Social History,  2001, 26(1), 40-59.

Seymour Drescher, “Abolitionist Expectations,” in Howard Temperley, ed., After Slavery, 41-66.

Stanley Engerman, “Comparative Approaches to the Ending of Slavery,” Slavery and Abolition, 2000, 21(2), 281-300.

Pieter Emmer, “Freedman and Asian Indentured Laborers in the Post-Emancipation Caribbean, 1834-1917, in Howard Temperley, ed., After Slavery, 150-168.

Janet Ewald, “Crossers of the Sea: Slaves, Freedman, and Other Migrants in the Northwestern Indian Ocean, c. 1750-1914,” American Historical Review, 2000, 105(1) 69-91.

Leon Fink, “From Autonomy to Abundance: Changing Beliefs About the Free Labor System in 19th century America,” in Stanley Engerman, ed., Terms of Labor, 116-136.

Jim Hagen and Robert Castle, “Settlers and the State: The Creation of an Aboriginal Workforce in Austrialia,” Aboriginal History, 1998 (22), 24-35.

Zine Magubane, “Labour Laws and Stereotypes: Images of Khoikhoi in the Cape in the Age of Abolition,” South African Historical Journal, 1996 (35) 115-134.

Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, “Spanish Cuba: Race and Class in Spanish and Cuban Anti-Slavery Ideology,” Cuban Studies, 25 1995, 101-122.

Rebecca Scott, “Defining the Boundaries of Freedom in the World of Cane: Cuba, Brazil and Lousiana after Emancipation,” American Historical Review, 99(1), 1994 70-102.